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The Transition House, Inc.

Find peace when you pair meditation with counseling

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An ancient practice, meditation is a powerful tool that has been used throughout history to relax the body and the mind. Meditation is often associated with religious practice, but modern meditation has emphasized stress reduction, relaxation, and self-improvement. More specifically, meditation is the practice of focusing attention on one’s breathing and internal bodily sensations.

Like yoga, meditation is encouraged by many medical professionals when an individual is going through therapy or treatment for addiction or substance abuse. Meditation has been proven to help mental concentration and clarity, reduce anxiety and depression, and promote a deep sense of inner peace.

Meditation also offers a healthy way to relieve anger and stress, which we all can experience on a daily basis. Individuals struggling with anxiety or insomnia may find that meditation helps relax the body and clears the mind of worries and anxious thoughts. For individuals with chronic pain, meditation can help with pain management. Mediation uses skills to teach individuals to divert attention and regain control over the body’s responses.

Researchers have found that the present-moment focus that meditation promotes can improve overall well-being. Meditation allows an individual to dive deeper into an awareness of their emotions, thoughts, and sensations that arise in the mind without judgment or reactivity.

Of course, meditation shouldn’t be the sole form of therapy you depend on. Research has shown that pairing meditation with counseling or therapy can greatly improve your success with your treatment.  Research from Harvard Medical School has shows that “a mindfulness-based stress reduction program helped quell anxiety symptoms in people with generalized anxiety disorder, a condition marked by hard-to-control worries, poor sleep, and irritability. People in the control group—who also improved, but not as much as those in the meditation group—were taught general stress management techniques. All the participants received similar amounts of time, attention, and group interaction."

Mediation can clearly help open the mind and body to live in the present moment and gives you a greater chance of success when going to therapy or counseling. Read more about our Counseling Center and offerings here


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